Archives For cytomegalovirus

Brain metastases caused by solid tumors in others parts of the body and cause many cancer related deaths.  Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV or CMV) is recently been detected consistently using the latest methods reviewing brain metastases tumors from primary breast and colorectal cancers.

This report shows for the first time a very high prevalence of CMV infection in brain metastasis from both breast and colorectal cancers.  CMV proteins now being proven to drive cancers were detected in 99% (n = 78) brain metastasis samples and also in 92% to 100% (n = 25) of corresponding breast and colorectal cancer specimens.

Patients who had low-grade CMV infections in the primary tumor or the brain metastasis had a longer time to tumor progression and overall longer survival (13.5 months Overall Survivial with low-grade infection compared to 6.9 months with high grade infections).  Time to tumor progression was also longer with low-grade CMV infections at 65.1 months average versus 30 months with high-grade infection.  Importantly, the presence of CMV in brain metastasis may open new treatment options as recently tests with Glioblastoma brain tumors have shown significant increases in survival by treating these highly prevalent CMV infected tumors with anti-virals like Valcyte.

Research also shows 94% of lymph node metastasis of breast cancer and 99% of brain metastasis of colorectal and breast cancers are CMV protein positive, but virus positivity is nearly absent in healthy surrounding tissues implying a viral presence in metastasis initiating cells.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4311044/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500419/ 

USC confirms CMV as a Cancer causing Oncovirus and drive the most common salivary cancers.

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20111116/Study-confirms-link-between-CMV-and-mucoepidermoid-carcinoma.aspx

An important new study from the Laboratory for Developmental Genetics at USC has confirmed cytomegalovirus (CMV) as a cause of the most common salivary gland cancers. CMV joins a group of fewer than 10 identified oncoviruses – cancer-causing viruses – including HPV.

The findings, published online in the journal Experimental and Molecular Pathology over the weekend, are the latest in a series of studies by USC researchers that together demonstrate CMV’s role as an oncovirus, a virus that can either trigger cancer in healthy cells or exploit mutant cell weaknesses to enhance tumor formation.

Lead author Michael Melnick, professor of developmental genetics in the Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC and Co-Director of the Laboratory for Developmental Genetics, said the conclusion that CMV is an oncovirus came after rigorous study of both human salivary gland tumors and salivary glands of postnatal mice.

CMV’s classification as an oncovirus has important implications for human health. The virus, which has an extremely high prevalence in humans, can cause severe illness and death in patients with compromised immune systems and can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to CMV for the first time while pregnant. It may also be connected to other cancers besides salivary gland cancer, Melnick added.

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Brain cancers and head and neck cancers together account for more than 873,000 cases annually worldwide, with an increasing incidence each year.

A major problem with such research is that the role of many infectious agents may be underestimated due to the lack of or inconsistency in experimental data obtained globally.

Our analysis of the literature showed the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in distinct types of brain tumour, namely glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and medulloblastoma. In particular, there are reports of viral protein in up to 100% of GBM specimens.